Sunday, October 25, 2009

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I'm quickly loosing interest now. I tried sketching out a scene looking down from above...but it's frustrating when I don't know where to start with perspective. I wasn't taught perspective much and it holds EVERYTHING back for me. :( I'm very frustrated.

So what you see is where I've ended up. I have a feeling I'm screwed if I can't get perspective around my head. Any suggestions on books or sites that make it easy to understand? I have one of those small dover books about perspective...and even that I'm having a hard time understanding. Don't have any classes available to get into either. I also need books that talk about the figure in perspective. Out of all of mine, there's like one page on the topic and it's assuming you know perspective.

I'm so lost. I feel like this piece just got WAY boring.

2 comments:

Lyon said...

I find the best books for figure in perspective are the manga and action comics ones.

One I kike is called the Figure in Motion.

I also harass my family and friends into posing for me in odd positions.

Another option is image searches on the internet. Not the best but you can get a clue as to what parts of the body look like so you can interpret how your characters look.

Perspective is hard to define in words, it's one of those things you just have to work at, like color sense.

You have a GREAT color sense. I have a feeling that pushing yourself in perspective will get you great there too.

Find images of perspective by other artists you like. Try to emulate their styles to get a better idea of how they work it in.

Carmen Keys said...

Sara I have a lot of similar problems with my work as you do. I wonder if it would help to pick one perspective challenge at a time and gain some proficiency in it before moving on to the next?
My Grandma gave me a good little book called "Perspective" by William F. Powell. It is far less complex than other books I've tried using on the subject.
So... what about trying to master something like aerial/from above perspective, or perhaps from the ground looking up first? The scene you have here with the ice skaters could have some added drama if we were looking up from ground level (even closer down than we are right now). Now how to *do* that, I have no idea. But maybe just trying a whole bunch of sketches from that point of view could make you more comfortable with it. Put this particular drawing away for awhile and you could use it as a springboard for what you really wanted to do with it later. It does have a lot going for it with all of the figures and action going on -- perhaps you just need a break from trying to figure it out!
I feel your pain. :)