Sunday, August 8, 2010

to license or what...?

So I've been researching licensing all week long - thanks to some links from Patti I've had quite a lot to go through.  My first try will be to find a licensing agent (I have a list of 3 of my dream choices, followed by 3 or 4 second tier ones...and then a bunch of 'if I can't find anything better' types)...and go from there.  If the agent doesn't work, then I'll attempt to license them myself and if I have any success with that, then I'll reattempt to contact an agent.

But going into this I have a prominent animation producer who says he likes the characters so much he 'wants to eat them up' and the president of nickelodeon said they were a breath of fresh air.  So I'm going to be overusing those two quotes as much as possible until someone of prominence sees these and does something financially fantastic (for me) with them.

At least that's the idea...

I'm still putting together a title page and a little blurb about them...so those are the final hurdles...I should be finished with it in the next week and a half or so...and then I'll be casting it out and we'll see if I have any bites...

4 comments:

pete said...

Well, it's gotta feel pretty awesome to get positive feedback from the high-ups in the animation industry! Congrats on that, for sure.

I know very little about licensing. Care to share about what it is your trying to do/what licensing means to the layman? Sell the rights to these guys for merchandising or shows to any bidders? Does that mean you give up all rights? I'd like to learn more.

By the way, the image is real nice. These characters stand our very nice against a clean white background. Is this one for your licensing pitch?

Isaac Marzioli - Freelance Illustrator said...

Licensing is a huge industry - and it's a good way to make money AND keep the copyright AND control of your characters/art.

Basically you enter into a deal with a company that will take your art and put it on products - they are the licensee and they are your client. They get the use of your art for a predetermined amount of time (usually between 1 and 3 years)for their products.

Many people have several licenses running at the same time, and even with the same art...so depending on your deal, you could make quite a lot of money.

I still have so much to learn about it though - so I'm still working it out. With these particular drawings, I did several versions - these two with my two main characters and then clean-up (nonpainted versions) of a bunch of other characters - a fox, an elephant, a pig, and a couple of others. I'm trying to show how terribly cute they are as well as versatile...and I might even mock up some on products to show an agent what they'll look like. But we'll see...

sara.b said...

Licensing can be a great way to build up your name, your work, and make some money while you're at it. I license my work out as well...tho I don't feel as professional as Isaac does. :P Isaac, you're going the real honest to goodness business route in licensing and that's so exciting to hear! I truly hope you get some great deal makers!

But it can be a sticky business as well. Making sure you get the quarterly or monthly updates showing what sold, making sure you have a good communication with your licensees, and read through the contract very carefully. This is all if you do it alone. With an agent, I think that would be top notch if you had one! They do a lot of great leg work for you and if you find a good one, will keep you informed.

Dude, keep us updated! Can't wait to hear how it turns out for you. And yeah, if someone doesn't pick up your cuties...something is terribly wrong with this world!!!

kris fulk said...

I agree with Sara - keep us up to date! Licensing sounds like a really great move, and I can't wait to see your toons on stationeries, cups, blankets, among other things!